Extreme Cold Safety Tips

General Information

  • Minimize travel if possible.
  • Stay indoors during the worst part of the extreme cold.
  • Keep a winter survival kit in your vehicle if you must travel.
  • Check tire pressure, antifreeze levels, heater/defroster, etc.
  • Learn how to shut off water valves for potential pipe bursts.
  • Check on the elderly.
  • Bring pets inside

How Should I Dress?

  • Wear layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing.
  • Wear a hat, because 40% of your body heat can be lost from your head.
  • Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extreme cold.
  • Mittens, snug at the wrist, are better than gloves.
  • Try to stay dry and out of the wind.

For more information visit http://www.ready.gov/winter-weather

 

 

Carbon Monoxide

As we all know winter is now upon us and the days are getting colder. As we turn on our heaters, use our wood stoves and fire places we should all be reminded of the dangers of Carbon monoxide and the importance of having a home Carbon monoxide detector. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

Sources of Carbon Monoxide

Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; back-drafting from furnaces, gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke. Incomplete oxidation during combustion in gas ranges and unvented gas or kerosene heaters may cause high concentrations of CO in indoor air. Worn or poorly adjusted and maintained combustion devices (e.g., boilers, furnaces) can be significant sources, or if the flue is improperly sized, blocked, disconnected, or is leaking. Auto, truck, or bus exhaust from attached garages, nearby roads, or parking areas can also be a source.

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs. Additional ventilation can be used as a temporary measure when high levels of CO are expected for short periods of time.

  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Consider purchasing a vented space heater when replacing an unvented one.
  • Use proper fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Install and use an exhaust fan vented to outdoors over gas stoves.
  • Open flues when fireplaces are in use.
  • Choose properly sized wood stoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that doors on all wood stoves fit tightly.
  • Have a trained professional inspect, clean, and tune-up central heating system (furnaces, flues, and chimneys) annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle the car inside garage.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

 

 Happy Holidays from Tabernacle Rescue Squad

As the year comes to a close, we would like to thank everyone for the continued support you have shown Tabernacle Rescue Squad, whether it be in the form of a donation, volunteering your time, or just a “thank you”, we truly appreciate you.

The Officers and Members of Tabernacle Rescue Squad wish you and yours a happy and safe holiday season!

happy-holidays

 

Halloween Safety

The Members of the Tabernacle Rescue Squad would like to wish everyone a Happy and Safe Halloween. Below are some tips to help make for a safe and fun evening for trick-or-treaters.

  • Plan your route ahead of time.
  • Trick or treat in familiar neighborhoods.
  • Carry a flashlight with fresh batteries after dark.
  • Take along a cell phone.
  • Wear identification that's easy to read.
  • Always trick or treat in groups, accompanied by an adult.
  • Follow a curfew and take a watch with a backlight.
  • Stay on the sidewalks and out of the streets. Cross only at intersections and designated crosswalks.
  • Walk. No running.
  • Don't trample through flower beds and gardens.
  • Watch out for open flames in jack-o-Lanterns.
  • Walk with your head up and be aware of your surroundings.
  • Only visit well lit houses. Don't stop at dark houses.
  • Don't enter any houses unless you know the people.
  • Carry a spare Halloween bag, in case yours breaks or you fill your original one.
  • Don't approach unfamiliar pets and animals.
  • Don't cut across yards and stay out of backyards.
  • Follow traffic signals and don't jaywalk.
  • Always watch for cars backing up or turning.
  • Review the "stop, drop and roll" procedure in case your costume catches on fire.
  • Never accept rides from strangers.
  • Respect other people and their property.
  • Be polite and say "thank you."
  • Don't eat any candy until it's inspected for tampering under bright lights.
  • Avoid candy that has loose wrappings, is unwrapped, has puncture holes, or is homemade.
  • Small children should not be allowed hard candy they may choke on.
  • Report any suspicious or criminal activity to an adult or the police.
  • Slow Down!! Kids can run out of anywhere and dark costumes may disguise them and make them hard to see.

 

halloween

 

Ebola Facts and Information


With the current threat of Ebola in the United States our first responders are now preparing to respond to a possible Ebola infection. Below are some facts about the Ebola Vrius. 

Symptoms of Ebola include

  • Fever (greater than 38.6°C or 101.5°F)
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Weakness
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal (stomach) pain
  • Unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising)

Symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

Recovery from Ebola depends on good supportive clinical care and the patient’s immune response. People who recover from Ebola infection develop antibodies that last for at least 10 years.

Click here for further information about Ebola

 

Back to School

The members of the Tabernacle Rescue Squad would like to remind everyone that school is about to be back in session. Please read some of the tips below provided by the National Highway Safety Advisory Board to make sure yourself and our chidren have a safe begining to the new school year.

Drivers

  • When backing out of a driveway or leaving a garage, watch out for children walking or bicycling to school.
  • When driving in neighborhoods with school zones, watch out for young people who may be thinking about getting to school, but may not be thinking of getting there safely.
  • Slow down. Watch for children walking in the street, especially if there are no sidewalks in neighborhood.
  • Slow down. Watch for children playing and congregating near bus stops.
  • Be alert. Children arriving late for the bus may dart into the street with out looking for traffic.
  • Learn and obey the school bus laws in your state. Learn the "flashing signal light system" that school bus drivers use to alert motorists of pending actions:
    • Yellow flashing lights indicate that the bus is preparing to stop to load or unload children. Motorists should slow down and prepare to stop their vehicles.
    • Red flashing lights and extended stop arms indicate that the bus has stopped, and that children are getting on or off. Motorists must stop their cars and wait until the red lights stop flashing, the extended stop sign is withdrawn, and the bus begins moving before they can start driving again.

Children

  • Get to the bus stop at least five minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive.
  • When the bus approaches, stand at least three giant steps (6 feet) away from the curb, and line up away from the street.
  • Wait until the bus stops, the door opens, and the driver says that it's okay before stepping onto the bus.
  • If you have to cross the street in front of the bus, walk on the sidewalk or along the side of the road to a point at least five giant steps (10 feet) ahead of the bus before you cross. Be sure that the bus driver can see you, and you can see the bus driver.
  • Use the handrails to avoids falls. When exiting the bus, be careful that clothing with drawstrings, and book bags with straps don't get caught in the handrails or doors.
  • Never walk behind the bus.
  • Walk at least three giant steps away from the side of the bus.
  • If you drop something near the bus, tell the bus driver. Never try to pick it up because the driver may not be able to see you.

Parents

  • Teach children to follow these common sense practices to make school bus transportation safer.

 

dangerzone

 

Page 5 of 22

2016
CALL STATISTICS
JANUARY  61
FEBRUARY  70 
MARCH  74 
APRIL  71 
MAY  78 
JUNE  74 
JULY  101 
AUGUST  73 
SEPTEMBER  71 
OCTOBER  99 
NOVEMBER  77 
DECEMBER   
YTD  849

 

2015
CALL STATISTICS
JANUARY  85
FEBRUARY  73 
MARCH  71 
APRIL  68 
MAY  73 
JUNE  157 
JULY  63 
AUGUST  70 
SEPTEMBER  77 
OCTOBER  68 
NOVEMBER  85 
DECEMBER  73 
YTD  983

 

 

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