Spring weather can be unpredictable. When severe weather hits unexpectedly, the risk of injury and death increases, so planning ahead makes sense. Prepare for storms, floods, and tornadoes as if you know in advance they are coming, because in the spring, they very likely will.

Spring is the time of year when many things change—including the weather. Temperatures can swing back and forth between balmy and frigid. Sunny days may be followed by a week of stormy weather. Sometimes extreme weather changes can occur even within the same day. Mark Twain once said, "In the spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six kinds of weather inside of four and twenty hours."

Thunderstorms cause most of the severe spring weather. They can bring lightning, tornadoes and flooding. Whenever warm, moist air collides with cool, dry air, thunderstorms can occur. For much of the world, this happens in spring and summer.

Because spring weather is...Read More


Spring Storms




It is that time of year again and the New Jersey State Forestry Services is begining its annual prescribed burning program. Over the next month residents in Tabernacle and the surounding communites may see smoke or even fires from these prescribed burns. It is recommended that residents stay out of these areas while these burns are taking place.   

“Prescribed burning is part of a planned strategy that the state uses to reduce accumulations of undergrowth, fallen branches and downed trees that can act as tinder and increase the severity of wildfires, making them difficult to control,” said State Forester Lynn Fleming. “Prescribed burns help protect lives and property and, at the same time, improve the overall health of our forests.”

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Prescribed BurningPhoto: (CLEM MURRAY / Staff Photographer)


Extreme Cold Safety Tips

General Information

  • Minimize travel if possible.
  • Stay indoors during the worst part of the extreme cold.
  • Keep a winter survival kit in your vehicle if you must travel.
  • Check tire pressure, antifreeze levels, heater/defroster, etc.
  • Learn how to shut off water valves for potential pipe bursts.
  • Check on the elderly.
  • Bring pets inside

How Should I Dress?

  • Wear layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing.
  • Wear a hat, because 40% of your body heat can be lost from your head.
  • Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extreme cold.
  • Mittens, snug at the wrist, are better than gloves.
  • Try to stay dry and out of the wind.

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Carbon Monoxide

As we all know winter is now upon us and the days are getting colder. As we turn on our heaters, use our wood stoves and fire places we should all be reminded of the dangers of Carbon monoxide and the importance of having a home Carbon monoxide detector. Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because it is impossible to see, taste or smell the toxic fumes, CO can kill you before you are aware it is in your home. At lower levels of exposure, CO causes mild effects that are often mistaken for the flu. These symptoms include headaches, dizziness, disorientation, nausea and fatigue. The effects of CO exposure can vary greatly from person to person depending on age, overall health and the concentration and length of exposure.

Sources of Carbon Monoxide

Unvented kerosene and gas space heaters; leaking chimneys and furnaces; back-drafting from furnaces, gas water heaters, wood stoves, and fireplaces; gas stoves; generators and other gasoline powered equipment; automobile exhaust from attached garages; and tobacco smoke. Incomplete oxidation during combustion in gas ranges and unvented gas or kerosene heaters may cause high concentrations of CO in indoor air. Worn or poorly adjusted and maintained combustion devices (e.g., boilers, furnaces) can be significant sources, or if the flue is improperly sized, blocked, disconnected, or is leaking. Auto, truck, or bus exhaust from attached garages, nearby roads, or parking areas can also be a source.

Steps to Reduce Exposure to Carbon Monoxide

It is most important to be sure combustion equipment is maintained and properly adjusted. Vehicular use should be carefully managed adjacent to buildings and in vocational programs. Additional ventilation can be used as a temporary measure when high levels of CO are expected for short periods of time.

  • Keep gas appliances properly adjusted.
  • Consider purchasing a vented space heater when replacing an unvented one.
  • Use proper fuel in kerosene space heaters.
  • Install and use an exhaust fan vented to outdoors over gas stoves.
  • Open flues when fireplaces are in use.
  • Choose properly sized wood stoves that are certified to meet EPA emission standards. Make certain that doors on all wood stoves fit tightly.
  • Have a trained professional inspect, clean, and tune-up central heating system (furnaces, flues, and chimneys) annually. Repair any leaks promptly.
  • Do not idle the car inside garage.

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning


 Happy Holidays from Tabernacle Rescue Squad

As the year comes to a close, we would like to thank everyone for the continued support you have shown Tabernacle Rescue Squad, whether it be in the form of a donation, volunteering your time, or just a “thank you”, we truly appreciate you.

The Officers and Members of Tabernacle Rescue Squad wish you and yours a happy and safe holiday season!



Halloween Safety

The Members of the Tabernacle Rescue Squad would like to wish everyone a Happy and Safe Halloween. Below are some tips to help make for a safe and fun evening for trick-or-treaters.

  • Plan your route ahead of time.
  • Trick or treat in familiar neighborhoods.
  • Carry a flashlight with fresh batteries after dark.
  • Take along a cell phone.
  • Wear identification that's easy to read.
  • Always trick or treat in groups, accompanied by an adult.
  • Follow a curfew and take a watch with a backlight.
  • Stay on the sidewalks and out of the streets. Cross only at intersections and designated crosswalks.
  • Walk. No running.
  • Don't trample through flower beds and gardens.
  • Watch out for open flames in jack-o-Lanterns.
  • Walk with your head up and be aware of your surroundings.
  • Only visit well lit houses. Don't stop at dark houses.
  • Don't enter any houses unless you know the people.
  • Carry a spare Halloween bag, in case yours breaks or you fill your original one.
  • Don't approach unfamiliar pets and animals.
  • Don't cut across yards and stay out of backyards.
  • Follow traffic signals and don't jaywalk.
  • Always watch for cars backing up or turning.
  • Review the "stop, drop and roll" procedure in case your costume catches on fire.
  • Never accept rides from strangers.
  • Respect other people and their property.
  • Be polite and say "thank you."
  • Don't eat any candy until it's inspected for tampering under bright lights.
  • Avoid candy that has loose wrappings, is unwrapped, has puncture holes, or is homemade.
  • Small children should not be allowed hard candy they may choke on.
  • Report any suspicious or criminal activity to an adult or the police.
  • Slow Down!! Kids can run out of anywhere and dark costumes may disguise them and make them hard to see.




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