Passing of Past Member Becky Scott

The Tabernacle Rescue Squad regrets to announce the passing of Paramedic Becky Scott. Becky was a former member of Station 439 as well as many other emergency services organizations in the county. Becky may have lost her courageous battle, but her legacy of service and compassion will live on through the countless lives she improved during her emergency services work and just as importantly, in those of us who were privileged to call her our friend. Rest in peace sister, we've got it from here.

 

 

Heat Advisory!

The National Weather Service has issued a Heat Advisory for the South Jersey area from June 11th-12nd, 2015. With heat index vaules predicted to be at or above 90˚ in South Jersey, it is important to be mindful of activities during your time outdoors.

We would like to share the following Red Cross safety tips for coping with the high temperatures:

  • Dress for the heat. Wear lightweight, light-colored clothing. Light colors will reflect away some of the sun's energy. It is also a good idea to wear hats or to use an umbrella.
  • Drink water. Carry water or juice with you and drink continuously even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid alcohol and caffeine, which dehydrate the body. Avoid using salt tablets unless directed to do so by a physician.
  • Eat small meals and eat more often. Avoid high-protein foods, which increase metabolic heat.
  • Slow down. Avoid strenuous activity. If you must do strenuous activity, do it during the coolest part of the day, which is usually in the morning between 4 and 7 a.m.
  • Stay indoors when possible. If air-conditioning is not available, stay on the lowest floor out of the sunshine. Remember that electric fans do not cool, they simply circulate the air.
  • Be a good neighbor. During heat waves, check in on elderly residents in your neighborhood and those who do not have air conditioning.
  • Learn Red Cross first aid and CPR.

Know What These Heat-Related Terms Mean:

Heat cramps: Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms due to heavy exertion. Although heat cramps are the least severe, they are an early signal that the body is having trouble with the heat.


Heat exhaustion: Heat exhaustion typically occurs when people exercise heavily or work in a hot, humid place where body fluids are lost through heavy sweating. Blood flow to the skin increases, causing blood flow to decrease to the vital organs. This results in a form of mild shock. If not treated, the victim may suffer heat stroke. Signals of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale flushed or red skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea or vomiting; dizziness; and exhaustion. Body temperature will be near normal.

Heat stroke: Also known as sunstroke, heat stroke is life-threatening. The victim's temperature control system, which produces sweating to cool the body, stops working. The body temperature can rise so high that brain damage and death may result if the body is not cooled quickly. Signals include hot, red and dry skin; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; and rapid, shallow breathing. Body temperature can be very high—sometimes as high as 105 degrees.

General Care for Heat Emergencies:

Heat cramps or heat exhaustion: Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. If the person is fully awake and alert, give half a glass of cool water every 15 minutes. Do not let him or her drink too quickly. Do not give liquids that contain alcohol or caffeine. Remove or loosen tight clothing and apply cool, wet cloths, such as towels or sheets. Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number if the person refuses water, vomits or loses consciousness.

Heat stroke: Heat stroke is a life-threatening situation! Help is needed fast. Call 9-1-1 or your local emergency number. Move the person to a cooler place. Quickly cool the body. Immerse victim in a cool bath, or wrap wet sheets around the body and fan it. Watch for signals of breathing problems. Keep the person lying down and continue to cool the body any way you can. If the victim refuses water or is vomiting or there are changes in the level of consciousness, do not give anything to eat or drink.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

excessive-heat Beware of Dehydration thumb
 

Happy EMS Week 2015

The Tabernacle Rescue Squad will be celebrating their Emergency Medical Service providers the week of May 17-23, 2013, for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Week. Each year, a week is designated to recognize the value and accomplishments of emergency medical services providers, nation-wide.

In Tabernacle Twp. and throughout the country, emergency medical services teams are ready at a moment’s notice to provide lifesaving care to those in need, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. Having that kind of immediate access to emergency care has been proven to greatly increase the survival and recovery rates of those with a sudden illness or injury. EMS systems consist of many parts, some of which include: emergency physicians, emergency nurses, emergency medical technicians, paramedics, firefighters, educators, dispatchers and administrators. Members of emergency medical services teams is Sandy Springs go through thousands of hours of specialized training and continuing education to enhance their lifesaving skills. Please take the time during EMS Week 2015 to recognize your local emergency medical services providers and to reflect on these few summer safety tips.

* Be smart. Don’t text and drive. No text message is worth the potential for a vehicle accident.

* Be healthy. Drink enough water. Don’t suffer from dehydration this summer. Inadequate hydration can lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

* Be secure. Install a fence at least four-feet high around all four sides of the pool and keep a close eye on children near a pool. Simple steps can prevent drowning. '

* Be safe. Wearing a helmet and other safety gear, while riding a bicycle or motorcycle, can prevent serious injury.

* Be cool. Don’t get sunburned. Limit sun exposure and wear sunscreen. Doing so can help you avoid painful sunburns.

EMS-Week-Header
 
 

Pool Safety

Many of us have opened or will be opening our pools very soon. Adding as many water safety steps as possible is the best way to assure a safe and fun experience in a residential swimming pool or spa. Parents and families can build on their current safety practices by adopting water safety steps at home pools and spas.

These are safety steps you can adopt at your residential pool or spa:

Staying Close, Being Alert and Watching Children in and Around the Pool

  • Always watch your children when they are in or near a pool or spa
  • Teach children basic water safety tips
  • Keep children away from pool drains, pipes and other openings to avoid entrapments
  • Have a portable telephone close by at all times when you or your family are using a pool or spa
  • If a child is missing, look for him or her in the pool or spa first
  • Share safety instructions with family, friends and neighbors

Learning and Practicing Water Safety Skills

  • Learn how to swim and teach your child how to swim
  • Learn to perform CPR on children and adults, and update those skills regularly
  • Understand the basics of life-saving so that you can assist in a pool emergency

Having the Appropriate Equipment for Your Pool or Spa

  • Install a four-foot or taller fence around the pool and spa and use self-closing and self-latching gates; ask your neighbors to do the same at their pools.
  • Install and use a lockable safety cover on your spa.
  • If your house serves as a fourth side of a fence around a pool, install door alarms and always use them. For additional protection, install window guards on windows facing pools or spas.
  • Install pool and gate alarms to alert you when children go near the water
  • Ensure any pool and spa you use has compliant drain covers, and ask your pool service provider if you do not know
  • Maintain pool and spa covers in good working order
  • Consider using a surface wave or underwater alarm

PoolSafetyTips
 

 

ATV Safety

There are more than 700 deaths and 100,000 injuries each year involving ATVs, according to CPSC’s most recent data. By following the key safety tips below, hundreds of deaths and thousands of injuries related to ATVs could be prevented.

Stay Off of Paved Roads

  • ATVs are designed to be driven on off-road terrain and are difficult to control on paved roads where they are at risk of overturning or colliding with cars and trucks.
  • In some states, it is illegal to ride ATVs on paved roads. Check the state or local laws and regulations where you plan to ride.
  • CPSC is deeply concerned that some states and local governments are changing their laws and ordinances to allow ATVs to be used on paved roads.  CPSC, the ATV industry, and consumer advocates are united in our belief that riding an ATV on a paved road can result in tragedy.

 

Never Allow Children Younger Than 16 on Adult ATVs

  • More than 90 percent of ATV-related injuries involving children can be attributed to a lack of developmental skills needed to maneuver the faster, more powerful adult ATVs.
  • Children younger than 16 should be on one of the age-appropriate youth models, which are required to travel at lower speeds than adult ATVs and to have an adjustable speed limiter.
  • All ATVs should be equipped with a label that indicates the manufacturer’s recommended age for that particular model.
  • Children younger than 6 years of age should never be on any ATV -- either as a driver or passenger.

 

Don’t Allow More People on the Vehicle Than It Was Designed to Carry

  • A single-rider ATV should only have one person on it -- the driver.
  • ATVs are designed for interactive riding. The driver must be able to shift his or her weight freely in all directions. Passengers can inhibit the driver’s ability to safely control the ATV and it could roll over or crash.
  • Most ATVs sold today are single-rider ATVs, which are not equipped with handholds or footrests for passengers.

Always Wear a Helmet and Other Protective Gear

  • CPSC and the ATV Safety Institute recommend U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and/or the Snell Memorial Foundation (Snell) certified helmets.
  • Riders should also wear goggles, gloves, long pants and a long-sleeved shirt, and over-the-ankle boots.

Get Hands-On Training

  • CPSC recommends that all ATV drivers -- adults and children -- take a hands-on ATV safety course from a qualified instructor.
  • Many deaths and injuries occur when an inexperienced driver loses control of an ATV, is thrown from an ATV, overturns the vehicle, or collides with a fixed object or a motor vehicle. Hands-on training can give experienced and first-time riders the skills to handle multiple riding situations that can happen in off-road conditions. 
  • Courses are offered by the ATV Safety Institute. Riders can also check with the National 4-H Council, local ATV rider groups, state agencies and some ATV manufacturers.

Information provided from cpsc.gov for more information please visit their website. 

 

 

ATV Safety

 

 PREPARE FOR SPRING WEATHER

Spring weather can be unpredictable. When severe weather hits unexpectedly, the risk of injury and death increases, so planning ahead makes sense. Prepare for storms, floods, and tornadoes as if you know in advance they are coming, because in the spring, they very likely will.

Spring is the time of year when many things change—including the weather. Temperatures can swing back and forth between balmy and frigid. Sunny days may be followed by a week of stormy weather. Sometimes extreme weather changes can occur even within the same day. Mark Twain once said, "In the spring I have counted one hundred and thirty-six kinds of weather inside of four and twenty hours."

Thunderstorms cause most of the severe spring weather. They can bring lightning, tornadoes and flooding. Whenever warm, moist air collides with cool, dry air, thunderstorms can occur. For much of the world, this happens in spring and summer.

Because spring weather is...Read More

 

Spring Storms

 

 

Page 4 of 23

2017
CALL STATISTICS
JANUARY  103
FEBRUARY  53 
MARCH  91 
APRIL  92 
MAY  88 
JUNE  84 
JULY   
AUGUST   
SEPTEMBER   
OCTOBER   
NOVEMBER   
DECEMBER   
YTD  511

 

2016
CALL STATISTICS
JANUARY  61
FEBRUARY  70 
MARCH  74 
APRIL  71 
MAY  78 
JUNE  74 
JULY  101 
AUGUST  73 
SEPTEMBER  71 
OCTOBER  99 
NOVEMBER  77 
DECEMBER  89 
YTD  938

 

 

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